C

 

A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z

 

CENT-CHAM

 

CABE-CARM   CARM-CENT   CENT-CHAM   CHAM-CHAM   CHAM-CHÂT   CHÂT(BALE)-CHÂT(BRAN)   CHÂT(BRAN)-CHÂT(CHEV)   CHÂT(CHEV)-CHÂT(DAUG)   CHÂT(DAUZ)-CHÂT(DEST)   CHÂT(DOIS)-CHÂT(GAZI)   CHÂT(GISC)-CHÂT(HAUT)   CHÂT(HAUT)-CHÂT(LACL)   CHÂT(LACL)-CHÂT(LAFO)   CHÂT(LAGA)-CHÂT(LATO)   CHÂT(LATO)-CHÂT(LÉOV)   CHÂT(LEPR)-CHÂT(MARQ)   CHÂT(MARQ)-CHÂT(OLIV)   CHÂT(OLIV)-CHÂT(PÉTR)   CHÂT(PÉTR)-CHÂT(ROCH)   CHÂT(ROLL)-CHÂT(VILL)   CHÂT(D'YQU)-CHIL   CHIL-CLOS   CLOS-COLD   COLD-CÔTE   CÔTE-CÔTE   CÔTE-CÔTE   CÔTE-CUVÉ

 

 

Only 4,5 and 5,0 NJP-wines (Nenad Jelisic Points) are presented as the best vintages.

 

If for some wine behind “the best vintages” stands “none”, it means that none of the wine's vintages got 4,5 NJP or 5,0 NJP.

 

 

Central Valley, a Chilean wine region that consists of four wine districts/valleys: Curicó Valley (pronounced: kur-ee-koh), Maipo Valley (my-po), Maule Valley (mow-lay) and Rapel Valley. The actual Rapel Valley consists of two wine areas/valleys: Cachapoal Valley (kah-cha-po-al) and Colchagua Valley (kohl-cha-gwa). The region have 95,631 ha under vine and its four districts and two areas, as the region itself, are classified as appellations (Denominación de Origen). (2012-03)

 

Central Valley, a USA's wine region that lies in California. It consists of 17 appellations (AVA): Alta Mesa, Borden Ranch, Capay Valley, Clarksburg, Clements Hills, Cosumnes River, Diablo Grande, Dunnigan Hills, Jahant, Lodi, Madera, Merritt Island, Mokelumne River, River Junction, Salado Creek, Sloughhouse and Tracy Hills. (2012-03)

 

Ceretto, Bricco Rocche, Barolo (red dry wine; 100% Nebbiolo), Piedmont, Italy, the best vintages, 1997, 2008, 2010 and 2013. (2018-05)

 

Cérons, a French appellation belonging the wine district of Graves, which in turn belongs to the wine region of Bordeaux.

 

Chablis, a French wine district (and appellation), which belongs to the wine region of Burgundy. The appellation has 5,044 ha planted with vines and 25% of these are owned by cooperative La Chablisienne. A good Premier Cru Chablis can be aged for 10 years while a good Grand Cru Chablis can be aged for 20 years. The majority of other Chablis wines should be drunk before they become 6 years old. A Chablis wine usually has a very dry and fresh taste with mineral character. (2012-09)

 

Chablis Grand Cru, there are seven Chablis Grand Crus: 1. Blanchots (12,7 ha), 2. Bougros (12,6 ha), 3. Les Clos (26 ha), 4. Grenouilles (9,4 ha), 5. Les Preuses (11,4 ha), 6. Valmur (13,2 ha) and 7. Vaudésir (14,7 ha). These seven Chablis Grand Crus are clustered just outside the village of Chablis, on mostly south westerly slopes, and together they cover 100 hectares. Of these seven Chablis Grand Crus, Les Clos gives the most powerful, flavoursome and ageable wines, Blanchots the most delicate and finesse-rich wines and Grenouilles the most fragrant wines. In the best vintages, Valmur is considered to give equally powerful, flavoursome and ageable wines as Les Clos. The allowed yield is 45 hl/ha. (2012-09)

 

Chablis grapes, Chardonnay. Other grapes are also grown but they may not be included in a Chablis wine.

 

Chablis and Petit Chablis, the permitted yield is 60 hl/ha in both quality classes. Most of Petit Chablis wines are almost impossible to drink because they are very unbalanced and have an extremely high tartaric acid. (2012-09)

 

Chablis Premier Cru, there are 40 Premier Crus. To the best belongs: Fourchaume, Mont de Milieu and Montée de Tonnerre. These 40 Premier Crus cover 778 ha. The allowed yield is 58 hl/ha, while the average is 57 hl/ha. What is most worrying with this quality class is that more and more vineyards, which are far from suitable to be classified as Premier Cru, are classed as such. (2012-09)

 

Chablis quality classes, Chablis has four quality classes: 1. Grand Cru (the highest class, 100 ha), 2. Premier Cru (778 ha), 3. Chablis (3,318 ha) and 4. Petit Chablis (843 ha). (2012-06)

 

Chablis soils, mixed soil that consists of marl and limestone and that is rich in fossils of small oysters, so-called Kimmeridgian soil. This combination of soils gives the wines from Chablis, the specific mineral taste. (2015-03)

 

Chablis the best vintages, 1962, 1966, 1969, 1985, 1995, 1996, 2002, 2008, 2010, 2014 and 2015. (2019-04)

 

Chacra, Cincuenta y Cinco (red dry wine; 100% Pinot Noir), Patagonia, Río Negro, Argentina, the best vintages, until vintage 2015 none. (2017-11)

 

Chacra, Treinta y Dos (red dry wine; 100% Pinot Noir), Patagonia, Río Negro, Argentina, the best vintages, until vintage 2012 none; 2013 and 2015. (2017-11)

 

Chambertin, a French Grand Cru and appellation that belongs to the appellation Gevrey-Chambertin, which belongs to the wine district Côte de Nuits, which in turn belongs to the wine region of Burgundy. Grand Cru has 13,2 hectares. It is fact that there are few wines that cost as much as wines from Chambertin, but it is also the fact that the quality of the wines varies from producer to producer. Even if Chambertin is called the "King of Wines", the appellation’s 23 producers do not always make wines that fully lives up to that reputation. Chambertin and Chambertin Clos de Bèze belong to the two best Grand Crus in the appellation Gevrey-Chambertin. The wines from Chambertin are more concentrated and tannin-rich than those from Chambertin Clos de Bèze while those from Chambertin Clos de Bèze is more complex and finesse-rich. The average yield is 33 hl/ha. (2012-02)

 

Chambertin grapes, Pinot Noir. (2012-02)

 

Chambertin soils, mixed soils. On top of the limestone is a layer consisting of marl (clayey soil that contains a lot of lime), gravel and clay. (2012-02)

 

Chambertin the best vintages, 1929, 1966, 1969, 1978, 1990, 2005, 2010, 2015 and 2016; not 2017. (2019-12)

 

Chambertin Clos de Bèze, a French Grand Cru and appellation that belongs to the appellation Gevrey-Chambertin, which belongs to the wine district Côte de Nuits, which in turn belongs to the wine region of Burgundy. Gran Crun has 15,4 hectares. Chambertin Clos de Bèze and Chambertin belong to the two best Grand Crus in the appellation Gevrey-Chambertin. The wines from Chambertin Clos de Bèze is more complex and finesse-rich while those from Chambertin are more concentrated and tannin-rich. The average yield is 35 hl/ha. (2012-02)

 

Chambertin Clos de Bèze grapes, Pinot Noir. (2012-02)

 

Chambertin Clos de Bèze soils, mixed soils. On top of the limestone is a layer consisting of marl (clayey soil that contains a lot of lime), gravel and clay. (2012-02).

 

Chambertin Clos de Bèze the best vintages, 1929, 1966, 1969, 1978, 1990, 2005, 2010, 2015 and 2016; not 2017. (2019-12)

 

Previous page   Next page

NJ Wines

Copyright© 2006-2021 NJ Wines. All Rights Reserved.