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Only 4,5 and 5,0 NJP-wines (Nenad Jelisic Points) are presented as the best vintages.

 

If for some wine behind “the best vintages” stands “none”, it means that none of the wine's vintages got 4,5 NJP or 5,0 NJP.

 

 

Pride Mountain Vineyards, Reserve Claret (red dry blend wine; Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Petit Verdot), Napa Valley, Sonoma Valley, North Coast, California, USA, the best vintages, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012 and 2013. (2016-12)

 

Pride Mountain Vineyards, Sangiovese (red dry blend wine; Sangiovese with Merlot), North Coast, California, USA, the best vintages, until vintage 2014 none. (2016-12)

 

Pride Mountain Vineyards, Syrah (red dry blend wine; Syrah with Viognier), Sonoma County, North Coast, California, USA, the best vintages, until vintage 2014 none. (2016-12)

 

Pride Mountain Vineyards, Vintner Select, Cabernet Sauvignon (red dry wine), North Coast, California, USA, the best vintages, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012 and 2013. (2016-12)

 

Pride Mountain Vineyards, Vintner Select, Chardonnay (white dry wine), Sonoma County, North Coast, California, USA, the best vintages, until vintage 2014 none. (2016-12)

 

Pride Mountain Vineyards, Vintner Select, Merlot (red dry wine), North Coast, California, USA, the best vintages, until vintage 2013 none. (2016-12)

 

Pride Mountain Vineyards, Viognier (white dry wine), Sonoma County, North Coast, California, USA, the best vintages, until vintage 2015 none. (2016-12)

 

Priorat, a Spanish DOCa-classified wine region, which belongs to the geographical area of Catalonia. Right now, only Rioja and Priorat are DOCa-classified. Priorat’s vineyards are planted on steep (15 to 60 degrees) terraced slopes along the Siruana and Montsant river valleys and lie at an altitude of 100 to 700 m above sea level. The region has both continental and Mediterranean climate. The summers are hot (max 40°C) while the winters are cold (min -3°C). On average it rains 400 to 600 mm per year (comparatively it rains 600 to 700 mm per year in Sweden) and the number of hours of sunshine per year is 2,600 (from 1,500 to 1,600 in Sweden). Priorat's 1,916 ha planted with vine give about 13,887 hl per year. The average yield is 1,500 kg of grapes per hectare and the maximum yield is 6,000 kg of grapes per hectare (for red wine grapes), corresponding to 39 hl/ha. The maximum yield for white wine grapes is 8,000 kg of grapes per hectare, corresponding to 52 hl/ha. The red wines usually consist of a blend of two or three of the following grapes: Garnacha Tinta, Cariñena, Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. Within Priorat, there are the following quality designations that regulate aging time: Crianza, Reserva and Gran Reserva. Crianza, the wine must be aged for at least 2 years, of which at least 12 months in oak barrels. Reserva, the wine must be aged for at least 3 years, of which at least 12 months in oak barrels and at least 24 months in the bottle. Gran Reserva, the wine must be aged for at least 6 years, of which at least 24 months in oak barrels and at least 48 months in the bottle. There are not so many wineries that follow those before mentioned aging times. Usually wines are produced that are classified as vino de guarda, i.e. the wines that must be aged for at least 2 years, of which at least 18 months in oak barrels and at least 6 months in the bottle. Palacio's famous vineyard L'Ermita (1,7 hectares), from which comes the world-famous wine L'Ermita, is the largest vineyard with old Garnacha vines in the wine region. (2018-01)

 

Priorat grapes, dominated by Garnacha Blanca and Macabeo for white wines, and Garnacha Tinta, Cariñena, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Merlot for red wines. (2018-01)

 

Priorato, another name to Priorat.

 

Priorat soils, vary, but they are characterized for a mixture that consists of black-reddish slate and mica. The mixture, which is called licorella, gives the wines a unique mineral character, good drainage properties, and both reflects sunbeams and stores the solar heat. When the sun has gone down, the stored solar heat in the mixture still emits the heat, which helps the ripening of the grapes. During the summer, the temperature of the mixture reaches 50°C. (2018-01)

 

Priorat the best vintages, 2001, 2010 and 2013. (2018-06)

 

Priorat the best wines, Cartus, Cims de Porrera Clàssic, Clos de l’Obac, Clos Dominic, Clos Martinet, Finca Dofi, L'Ermita, Mas Doix, Mas Martinet, Perinet+, Vinyes Altes and Vinyes Baixes. (2018-04)

 

Prosecco, both an Italian wine, and Italian wine district that is located in wine region of Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia. The wine district is 270 km long and extends over 651 municipalities. The absolute best wines come from appellation Asolo and appellation Conegliano Valdobbiadene, both of which are DOCG- classified. The vineyards are located between 50 and 500 m above sea level. Most of the wines that come from here are sparkling. Non-sparkling wines are also produced, but to a much lesser extent. Prosecco gets its bubbles through the tank ferentation method. Sugar and yeast are added to the base wine, which is then fermented a second time in a steel tank under pressure. The wine is then aged between 18 and 24 months in a steel tank before being poured into a bottle. In addition to the tank fermentation method, a method called metodo ancestrale is also used, but not so often. The method involves that the wine begins its fermentation in a tank and that the fermentation is then completed in a sealed bottle. This means that one pours the wine into bottle before it is fully fermented. The wine is never disgorged, and it is sold with the lees left in the bottle. This type of Prosecco goes by the name Col Fondo - which means "with lees ". (2021-02)

 

Prosecco grapes, several different local grape varieties and the most grown of these are Glera. (2021-02)

 

Prosecco soils, vary a lot, clay, sandstone, limestone, gravel, etc. (2021-02)

Prosecco the best vintages, unlike many wines, Prosecco is really a wine to drink when it is young. In practice this means that the longer a Prosecco-wine is aged the less powerful the bubbles will be which is not good for the taste of the wine. That means the vintage is mostly irrelevant when Prosecco-wines are in question. (2021-02)

 

Puligny-Montrachet, a French appellation that belongs to the wine district of Côte de Beaune, which in turn belongs to the wine region of Burgundy. The appellation consists of 4 Grand Crus (crus = vineyards) and 17 Premier Crus. All four Grand Crus have their own appellations. To these four Grand Crus belong: Bâtard-Montrachet, Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet, Chevalier-Montrachet and Montrachet, and to these 17 Premier Crus belong to: Champ Canet, Champ Gain, Clavaillon, Clos de la Garenne, Clos de la Mouchère, Hameau de Blagny, Le Cailleret, La Garenne, La Truffière, Les Chalu-Maux, Les Combettes, Les Demoiselles, Les Folatières, Les Perrières, Les Pucelles, Les Referts and Sous le Puits. The appellation has 235 ha under vine and of these 114 ha are classified as Premier Crus and 21 ha as Grand Crus. The average yield is 52 hl/ha. The interesting thing is that the Grand Crus Bâtard-Montrachet and Montrachet belong both to this appellation and appellation Chassagne-Montrachet. Qualitatively, the Chardonnay wines from this appellation are considered to be better than those from the Chassagne-Montrachet appellation. Right now, one hectare of Montrachet costs 23,4 million GBP (approximately 252 million SEK) and thereby it has the world's most expensive hectare price. (2012-10)

 

Puligny-Montrachet grapes, dominates Chardonnay (over 99%), the little rest belongs to Pinot Noir. (2012-06)

 

Pump-Over method, remontage in French, a method where the must is pumped from the bottom of the fermenter over the mass of skin (called cap in English or chapeau in French). (2012-08)

 

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