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ALSA-ANGE

 

AALT-ALSA   ALSA-ANGE   ANGE-ARLE   ARNO-AZIE

 

 

Only 4,5 and 5,0 NJP wines (Nenad Jelisic Points) are presented as the best vintages.

 

If for some wine behind “the best vintages” stands “none”, it means that none of the wine's vintages got 4,5 NJP or 5,0 NJP.

 

 

Alsace soils, limestone, silica mixed soil and mud. (2011-10)

 

Alsace type of wines: Crémant d' Alsace, Edelzwicker, Grand Cru, Vendange Tardive and Sélection de Grains Nobles.

 

Alsace type of wine: Crémant d' Alsace, the sparkling dry white wine made from several grape varieties according to the champagne method.

 

Alsace type of wine: Edelzwicker, white wine of simpler quality made of several grape varieties.

 

Alsace type of wine: Grand Cru, white wine from the best locations (vineyards) that has to be made of any of the following grapes: Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Tokay-Pinot Gris and Muscat. If the label indicates a vineyard designation, 100% of the grapes used to produce that wine must be from that vineyard. Otherwise, it is allowed to mix grapes from several Grand Crus (vineyards).

 

Alsace type of wine: Sélection de Grains Nobles, white wine made from late harvested, affected by Botrytis cinerea (Noble rot), grapes.

 

Alsace type of wine: Vendange Tardive, white wine made from late harvested, not affected by Botrytis cinerea (Noble rot), grapes.

 

Alvaro Palacios, Finca Dofi (red dry blend wine), Priorat, Spain, the best vintages, until vintage 2003 none; 2004, 2005, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. (2018-07)

 

Alvaro Palacios, L'Ermita (red dry blend wine), Priorat, Spain, the best vintages, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. (2018-07)

 

Alvaro Palacios, Les Terrasses (red dry blend wine), Priorat, Spain, the best vintages, until vintage 2016 none. (2018-07)

 

Amarone, a DOCG-wine from the 2010 vintage and one of the most internationally well-known of the Italian dry red wines. An Amarone-wine are usually made of three grapes: Corvina and/or Corvinone (40-70%), Rondinella (20-40%) and Molinara (5-25%). According to the rules from 2010: 1. the wine must contain 5-30% Rondinella, 2. it is allowed to add 10% of other indigenous grapes as Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, 3. it is allowed to add up to 15% of non-indigenous grapes as Syrah and 4. it may be not added more than 10% of a single indigenous or non-indigenous grape (except for the Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella and Molinara). The grapes are harvested in September/October. Then they are air-dried from about 90 to 120 days. This process of air drying is called appassimento (or passito). What is left after the drying process is raisin like grapes with high concentration that are then destemmed, crushed, fermented and then allowed to age in the Croatian or Slovenian oak barrels for about 24 to 48 months. After the barrel aging, the wine is bottled and allowed to age another 6 to 12 months before release. Many Amarone-wines are aged for 10 to 15 years before release. The best Amarone-wines have an excellent aging potential, up to 30 years. What is very worrying is that the Amarone-wine production, in just 6 years, had been increased from 11,250 hectoliters, in 1997, to 97,500 hectoliters, in 2013. An increase by extreme 88,5%; what is not good for the future of the Amarone-wines. To try to slow this dangerous trend, the winemaker’s consortium has decided that producers are allowed to dry to 50% of their total harvest. Note that in the 1970s, barely 5% of the total harvest were dried. (2017-03)

 

Amarone the best vintages, 1983, 1988, 1990, 1995, 1997, 1998, 2009 and 2016. (2019-06)

 

Amarone Classico, when an amaorone wine comes from the central part of the appellation Valopoliciella (from the municipalities: Fumane, Marano di Valpolicella, Negrar, San Pietro in Cariano and Sant'Ambrogio di Valpolicella), the part where Amarone wines started being produced, is called Amarone Classico. (2017-03)

 

American Viticultural Area (AVA), corresponds to the French AOC (Appelation d' Origine Contrôlée). (2012-09)

 

Andre Perret, Condrieu, Clos Chanson (white dry wine; 100% Viognier), Condrieu, Northern Rhône, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2005 none; 2006, 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2017. (2019-06)

 

Andre Perret, Condrieu, Chery (white dry wine; 100% Viognier), Condrieu, Northern Rhône, France, the best vintages, until vintage 1998 none; 1999, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014 and 2015. (2019-06)

 

Andrew Will Winery, Champoux (red dry blend wine), Yakima Valley, Columbia Valley, Washington, USA, the best vintages, 2001, 2007, 2008 and 2015. (2019-06)

 

Andrew Will Winery, Ciel du Cheval (red dry blend wine), Yakima Valley, Columbia Valley, Washington, USA, the best vintages, until vintage 2015 none. (2019-06)

 

Andrew Will Winery, Sorella (red dry blend wine), Washington, USA, the best vintages, 1995, 2001, 2006, 2007, 2012, 2014 and 2015. (2019-06)

 

Angelo Gaja, Barbaresco (red dry wine; 100% Nebbiolo), Piedmont, Italy, the best vintages, until vintage 2015 none. (2019-04)

 

Angelo Gaja, Conteisa (red dry blend wine; 92% Nebbiolo and 8% Barbera), Langhe, Piedmont, Italy, the best vintages, 1997, 2000, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2013 and 2014. (2019-04)

 

Angelo Gaja, Costa Russi (red dry blend wine; 95% Nebbiolo and 5% Barbera), Langhe-Barbaresco, Piedmont, Italy, the best vintages, 1989, 1990, 1997, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2013; not 2014 and 2015. (2019-04)

 

Angelo Gaja, Darmagi (red dry wine; 100% Cabernet Sauvignon), Langhe, Piedmont, Italy, the best vintages, until vintage 2015 none. (2019-04)

 

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