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Only 4,0, 4,5 and 5,0 NJP wines (Nenad Jelisic Points) are presented as the best vintages.

 

From October 2010, every time we update any information or write a new information, we shall write in parentheses when the update has last taken place e.g. (2010-10).

 

If for some wine stands behind the best vintages none, it means that the wine's price is too high for its quality or the wine's quality is too low.

 

 

Vacqueyras, a French appellation that belongs to the Southern Rhône wine district, which in turn belongs to the Rhone wine region. The appellation has 1,395 ha. The average yield is 34 hl/ha. The wine from this appellation must consist of a minimum of 50% Grenache, a minimum of 20% Syrah and Mourvèdre and a maximum of 10% of Cinsault or 10% other red and white grapes, does not apply to Carignan. The majority of the wines are aged in stainless steel tanks between 9 and 18 months. Very rarely is a Vacqueyras-wine aged in an oak barrel and if this is the case, then is about special cuvées of wines from old vines. A Vacqueyras-wine that is made according to all rules has a good aging potential, up to 10 years. (2012-01)

 

Vacqueyras grapes, Grenache, Syrah, Mourvèdre, Cinsault, Clairette, Bourboulenc and Picpoul. (2012-01)

 

Vacqueyras soils, rocky and sandy soil, red clay and limestone. (2012-04)

 

Vacqueyras the best vintages, 1978, 1989, 1990, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2007 and 2010. (2012-01)

 

Valle D'Aosta, an Italian wine region (the smallest wine region in Italy).  

 

Valle D'Aosta grapes, many different types such as Pinot Grigio, Chardonnay, Nebbiolo, Gamay, Syrah, etc.

 

Valle D'Aosta soils, dominates limestone.

 

Valpolicella, an Italian wine district that belongs to the wine region of Veneto. Valpolicella wine district consists of 4 DOC-appellations (Valpolicella, Valpolicella Classico, Valpolicella Ripasso and Valpolicella Superiore) and 2 DOCG-appellations (Amarone della Valpolicella and Recioto della Valpolicella). A Valpolicella DOC-wine can consist of the following red wine grapes: Corvina (40 to 80%), Corvinone (1 to 50%; instead of an equal proportion of Corvina), Rondinella (5 to 30%), other native red wine grapes such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot (1 to 10%) and non-native red wine grapes such as Syrah (1 to 15%). A Valpolicella Classico DOC-wine consists of the same type and percentage of red wine grapes as a Valpolicella DOC-wine, but the grapes must come from the so-called Classico-area, i.e. from the five original municipalities: Fumane, Marano di Valpolicella, Negrar, San Pietro in Cariano and Sant'Ambrogio di Valpolicella. A Valpolicella Ripasso DOC-wine consists of the same type and percentage of red wine grapes as a Valpolicella DOC wine, but a Valpolicella Ripasso DOC-wine must be fermented twice. The second time together with what has been over after that an Amarone or a Recioto-wine had been fermented and pressed. Before the second fermentation begins, it is allowed to add up to 15% Amarone-wine or dried grapes to the wine. A Valpolicella Superiore DOC-wine consists of the same type and percentage of red wine grapes as a Valpolicella DOC-wine, but a Valpolicella Superiore DOC-wine must be aged for at least 1 year before it is released on the market and must have at least 1% higher alcohol content than a Valpolicella DOC-wine. An Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG-wine consists of the same type and percentage of red wine grapes as a Valpolicella DOC-wine, but the grapes for an Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG-wine must be air dried for 100 to 120 days before the winemaking process begins. According to the 2010 rules, no more than 10% of a single native or non-native grape (do not apply to Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella and Molinara) may be added to an Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG-wine. A Recioto della Valpolicella DOCG-wine consists of the same type and percentage of red wine grapes as Valpolicella DOC-wine, but the grapes for a Recioto della Valpolicella DOCG-wine must be air dried for 100 to 120 days before the winemaking process begins. The Recioto della Valpolicella DOCG-wine gets its strong sweetness because the air dried grapes may not or can, due to excessive sugar content, ferment completely. (2017-03)

 

Valpolicella Classico, see Valpolicella.

 

Valpolicella grapes, Corvina (also known as Corvina Veronese), Rondinella and Molinara. Also grown: Cruina, Forselina, Negrara and Oseleta. (2013-02)

 

Valpolicella Ripasso, see Valpolicella.

 

Valpolicella soils, vary widely. Calcareous soil, gravel moraine, moraine, gravel, alluvial soil, volcanic soil, clay, etc. (2017-03)

 

Valpolicella Superiore, see Valpolicella.

 

Valpolicella the best vintages, 1947, 1983, 1988, 1990, 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012 and 2015. (2017-03)

 

Vasse Felix, Cabernet Sauvignon (red dry wine), Margaret River, Western Australia, Australia, the best vintages, until vintage 2013 none. (2018-12)

 

Vasse Felix, Chardonnay (white dry wine), Margaret River, Western Australia, Australia, the best vintages, until vintage 2015 none. (2018-12)

 

Vasse Felix, Heytesbury (red dry blend wine), Margaret River, Western Australia, Australia, the best vintages, until vintage 2012 none. (2018-12)

 

Vasse Felix, Heytesbury, Chardonnay (white dry wine), Margaret River, Western Australia, Australia, the best vintages, until vintage 2016 none. (2018-12)

 

VDP.Erste Lage, Germany’s Premier Cru. (2016-07)

 

VDP.Grosse Lage, the very best vineyards of Germany (Germany’s Grand Cru). A dry wine from a VDP.Grosse Lage is designated VDP.Grosses Gewächs (Grand Cru) and is bottled in a special bottle embossed with the “GG” logo. The use of the adjective Halbtrocken is optional. The use of the adjective Trocken is mandatory while for a wine with residual sweetness: Kabinett, Spätlese, Auslese, Beerenauslese, Eiswein or Trockenbeerenauslese is labelled as it is Kabinett or Spätlese and so on. (2016-07)

 

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