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CHÂT(MARQ)-CHÂT(OLIV)

 

CABE-CARM   CARM-CENT   CENT-CHAM   CHAM-CHAM   CHAM-CHÂT   CHÂT(BALE)-CHÂT(BRAN)   CHÂT(BRAN)-CHÂT(CHEV)   CHÂT(CHEV)-CHÂT(DAUG)   CHÂT(DAUZ)-CHÂT(DEST)   CHÂT (DOIS)-CHÂT(GAZI)   CHÂT(GISC)-CHÂT(HAUT)   CHÂT(HAUT)-CHÂT(LACL)   CHÂT(LACL)-CHÂT(LAFO)   CHÂT(LAGA)-CHÂT(LATO)   CHÂT(LATO)-CHÂT(LÉOV)   CHÂT(LEPR)-CHÂT(MARQ)   CHÂT(MARQ)-CHÂT(OLIV)   CHÂT(OLIV)-CHÂT(PÉTR)   CHÂT(PÉTR)-CHÂT(ROCH)   CHÂT(ROLL)-CHÂT(VILL)   CHÂT(D'YQU)-CHIL   CHIL-CLOS   CLOS-COLD   COLD-CÔTE   CÔTE-CÔTE   CÔTE-CÔTE   CÔTE-CUVÉ

 

 

Only 4,5 and 5,0 NJP-wines (Nenad Jelisic Points) are presented as the best vintages.

 

If for some wine behind “the best vintages” stands “none”, it means that none of the wine's vintages got 4,5 NJP or 5,0 NJP.

 

 

Château Marquis de Terme (red dry blend wine), Quatrièmes Crus according to the 1855 Classification, Margaux, Haut Médoc, Médoc, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Meyney (red dry blend wine), Cru Bourgeois, Saint Estèphe, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Monbousquet (red dry blend wine), Not Classified, Saint Émilion, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Monbousquet, Blanc (white dry blend wine), Not Classified, Saint Émilion, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Monbrison (red dry blend wine), Cru Bourgeois, Margaux, Haut Médoc, Médoc, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Montelena, Chardonnay (white dry wine), Napa Valley, North Coast, California, USA, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Montelena, The Montelena Estate, Cabernet Sauvignon (red dry wine), Napa Valley, North Coast, California, USA, the best vintages, 1986, 1987, 1997, 2002 and 2014; from vintage 2015 until vintage 2016 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Montrose (red dry blend wine), Deuxièmes Crus according to the 1855 Classification, Saint Estèphe, Haut Médoc, Médoc, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, 1959, 1961, 1989, 1990, 1996, 2000, 2003, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018. (2019-08)

 

Château Moulin du Cadet (red dry blend wine), Grand Cru Classé, Saint Émilion, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Moulin Haut Laroque (red dry blend wine), Fronsac, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Moulin Saint Georges (red dry blend wine), Grands Crus Classé, Saint-Émilion, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Mouton Rothschild, a French wine castle (château in French) that is located in the appellation Pauillac and, which 1973 (not 1855) was classified as Premier Cru. The Château Mouton Rothschild has 84 hectares planted with vines. (2011-03)

 

Château Mouton Rothschild, a French wine of Château Mouton Rothschild. The wine consists of approximately 83% Cabernet Sauvignon, 14% Merlot and 3% Cabernet Franc. Average age of the vines is 48 years (year 2008), planting density is 8,500 vines per hectare and the yield is 22-26 hl/ha. After the grapes have been carefully selected in the field and in the cellar, they are destemmed and crushed very gently. The crushed mass (must) consisting of grape juice, pulp, skins and seeds is pumped into vats of oak (Château Mouton Rothschild is one of the last wine chateaux in Médoc that still using vats of oak) where fermentation begins. The fermentation takes place under controlled temperature, 28-30 degrees, and continues for a period from 15 to 25 days. Only the natural yeast coming from vineyards is used. In order to intensify leaching, the fermenting wine is pumped, several times per day, from the bottom of the fermenter over the skin mass. After the fermentation the fermented wine is macerated for 21 days and then undergoes malolactic fermentation. Once the malolactic fermentation, which usually takes about 10 days, is completed it is time to determine, with the help of extensive tastings that have been made during the manufacturing process, which wine (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc) and which parts of the vineyard to be mixed. The mixed wine is moved in mostly new French oak barrels (barriques) and aged for a period of 19 to 22 months. During the aging, which usually takes about 18 months, the wine is moved (racked) from one barrel to another about 6 times and clarified by the use of egg whites one time. After the aging, the wines are bottled and aged for a few months before they are released on the market. The wine does not undergo filtration. Château Mouton Rothschild has a great aging potential, from 20 to 30 years. (2011-03)

 

Château Mouton Rothschild (red dry blend wine), Premier Cru according to the 1855 Classification (was classified in this wine class in 1973), Pauillac, Haut Médoc, Médoc, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, 1945, 1947, 1953, 1955, 1959, 1961, 1982, 1986, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018. (2019-08)

 

Château Mouton Rothschild grapes, 83% Cabernet Sauvignon, 14% Merlot and 3% Cabernet Franc. (2011-03)

 

Château Mouton Rothschild soils, mostly gravel, with grain size from 4 to 64 mm, on top of marl (clayey soil rich in lime) and clay. The majority of the grapes that are used for Château Mouton Rothschild comes from a piece of land known as the Grand Plateau. Here the soil consists of a layer of gravel that is up to 8 meters thick and, which overlies larger stones, clay and marl. (2011-09)

 

Chateau Musar (red dry blend wine; Cabernet Sauvignon, Cinsault and Carignan), Bekaa Valley, Lebanon, the best vintages, until vintage 2012 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Nairac (white sweet blend wine), Deuxièmes Crus according to the 1855 Classification for Sauternes and Barsac, Barsac, Graves, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Nenin (red dry blend wine), Pomerol, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Châteauneuf-du-Pape, a French appellation that belongs to the wine district Southern Rhône, which in turn belongs to the wine region of Rhône. The appellation was created already in 1933. The appellation has 3,200 ha of which 3,134 ha are used for wine production. On average, the number of hours of sunshine per year is 2,800 (1,500 to 1,600 in Sweden). The allowable yield is 35 hl/ha, while the average is 32 hl/ha. The so-called "prestige cuvée", which are produced in small series of 2,000 to 10,000 bottles, are aged in new or a few years old oak barrels (barriques), while the "regular" Châteauneuf-du-Pape wines are aged in concrete containers or old 3,000 to 5,000 litre oak casks or in 600 litre old oak barrels. (2017-11)

 

Châteauneuf-du-Pape grapes, 13 different grape varieties are allowed (Bourboulenc, Cinsault, Clairette, Cunoise, Grenache, Mourvèdre, Muscardin, Picardan, Picpoul, Roussanne, Syrah, Terret Noir and Vaccarèse). Of these 13 varieties dominate Grenache (72%), Syrah (11%), Mourvedre (6%), Cinsault (3%) and Clairette (3%). It is allowed to make wine of just one variety of these or wine of all them. (2014-03)

 

Châteauneuf-du-Pape soils, large gravel stones (galets roulés), red clay, gravel, sand, sandy soil and limestone. The stones (galets roulés) are known to retain heat from the sun during the day to release it at night. Thanks to that the grapes ripen in the north and northeastern part of the appellation faster than in the eastern and the southern part of the appellation, where the soil is mostly sand and sandy respectively. (2014-03)

 

Châteauneuf-du-Pape the best vintages, 1978, 1990, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2016; not 2017. (2019-05)

 

Château Olivier (red dry blend wine), Classified according to the 1959 Classification for both red and white wines, Pessac-Léognan, Graves, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages for red wine, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

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