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CÔTE-CÔTE

 

CABE-CARM   CARM-CENT   CENT-CHAM   CHAM-CHAM   CHAM-CHÂT   CHÂT(BALE)-CHÂT(BRAN)   CHÂT(BRAN)-CHÂT(CHEV)   CHÂT(CHEV)-CHÂT(DAUG)   CHÂT(DAUZ)-CHÂT(DEST)   CHÂT (DOIS)-CHÂT(GAZI)   CHÂT(GISC)-CHÂT(HAUT)   CHÂT(HAUT)-CHÂT(LACL)   CHÂT(LACL)-CHÂT(LAFO)   CHÂT(LAGA)-CHÂT(LATO)   CHÂT(LATO)-CHÂT(LÉOV)   CHÂT(LEPR)-CHÂT(MARQ)   CHÂT(MARQ)-CHÂT(OLIV)   CHÂT(OLIV)-CHÂT(PÉTR)   CHÂT(PÉTR)-CHÂT(ROCH)   CHÂT(ROLL)-CHÂT(VILL)   CHÂT(D'YQU)-CHIL   CHIL-CLOS   CLOS-COLD   COLD-CÔTE   CÔTE-CÔTE   CÔTE-CÔTE   CÔTE-CUVÉ

 

 

Only 4,5 and 5,0 NJP-wines (Nenad Jelisic Points) are presented as the best vintages.

 

If for some wine behind “the best vintages” stands “none”, it means that none of the wine's vintages got 4,5 NJP or 5,0 NJP.

 

 

Côte Rôtie grapes, most Syrah. 20% of white wine made from Viognier may be mixed in, but in reality not more than 5% is usually mixed in. (2010-11)

 

Côte Rôtie soils, mixed. Granite overlain by a layer consisting of sand and lime-stone (côte blonde) or granite overlain by a layer consisting of shale, clay, and iron oxide (côte brune). The vineyards are planted on steep (up to 60 degrees) terraced slopes. The best slopes facing south and southeast. (2010-11)

 

Côtes de Blaye, a French appellation that belongs to the wine district Libournais (Right Bank), which in turn belongs to the wine region of Bordeaux. The appellation has 7,700 ha planted with vine. The average yield is 66 hl/ha. None château, which belongs to the appellation Côtes de Blaye, is classified. (2012-06)

 

Côtes de Blaye grapes, Merlot dominates followed by Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Malbec with a little Petit Verdot. Approximately 10% of white wines, which are produced in this appellation, comes from Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon and Muscadelle. (2012-06)

 

Côtes de Blaye soils, clay mixed with limestone, gravel and sand. (2012-06)

 

Côtes de Bordeaux Saint Macaire, a French appellation that belongs to the wine region Entre-Deux-Mers, which in turn belongs to the wine region of Bordeaux.

 

Côtes de Bourg, a French appellation that belongs to the wine district Libournais (Right Bank), which in turn belongs to the wine region of Bordeaux. The appellation has about 4,000 hahectares planted with vine. These approximately 4,000 hectares provide mostly red wines (200,000 hl), and to a lesser extent white wines (1,200 hl). The average yield is 50 hl/ha. None château, which belongs the appellation Côtes de Bourg, is classified. (2012-12)

 

Côtes de Bourg the best vintages, 1924, 1926, 1929, 1945, 1947, 1949, 1953, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1982, 1986, 1989, 1990, 1996, 2000, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2015, 2016 och 2018. (2020-04)

 

Côtes de Bourg grapes, Merlot (65%) dominates followed by Cabernet Sauvignon (20%), Cabernet Franc and a little Malbec. Those approximately 1% of white wines, which are produced in this appellation, comes from Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle. (2012-12)

 

Côtes de Bourg soils, limestone mixed with varying amounts of clay, gravel, sand or sandstone. (2012-12)

 

Côtes de Castillon, a French appellation that belongs to the wine district Libournais (Right Bank), which in turn belongs to the wine region of Bordeaux. The appellation has 2,900 hectares under vine. The average yield is 57 hl/ha. None château, which belongs to the appellation Côtes de Castillon, is classified. (2012-06)

 

Côtes de Castillon grapes, Merlot dominates followed by Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and little Malbec. (2012-06)

 

Côtes de Castillon soils, varies. Clay, gravelly and sandy clay, and limestone mixed with marl, clay and sandstone. (2012-06)

 

Côtes de Francs, a French appellation that belongs to the wine district Libournais (Right Bank), which in turn belongs to the wine region of Bordeaux. The appellation has 490 hectares planted with vine. The average yield is 55 hl/ha. None château, which belongs the appellation Côtes de Francs, is classified. (2012-06)

 

Côtes de Francs grapes, Merlot dominates followed by Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc with some Malbec and Petit Verdot. Those approximately 10% of white wines, which are produced in this appellation, comes from Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle. (2012-06)

 

Côtes de Francs soils, the lower-lying slopes and valleys consist of clay while the higher-lying slopes consist of a mixture of clay and limestone that in a few cases is mixed with marl and chalk. (2012-06)

 

Côtes de Nuits-Villages, a French appellation that belongs to the Côte de Nuits wine district, which in turn belongs to the wine region Bourgogne.

 

Côtes de Nuits-Villages grapes, Pinot Noir dominates.

 

Côtes de Nuits-Villages soils, mixed soil. On top of limestone lies a layer consisting of marl (clayey soil rich in lime), gravel and clay.

 

Côtes-du-Rhône-Villages, a French appellation that belongs to the Southern Rhône wine district, which in turn belongs to Rhône wine region. Today, 70 villages have entitled to the appellation and 22 of these were also allowed to add their village names on the label. To these 22 belong: Cairanne, Chusclan, Gadagne, Laudun, Massif d' Uchaux, Nyons, Plan de Dieu, Puyméras, Roaix, Rochegude, Rousset-les-Vignes, Sablet, Sainte-Cécile, Saint-Gervais, Saint-Maurice, Saint-Pantaléon-les-Vignes, Séguret, Signargues, Suze-la-Rousse, Vaison-la-Romaine, Valréas and Visan. Villages ("entitled villages") that are in this class can be upgraded to appellation status as it happened to Gigondas (1971), Vacqueyras (1990), Beaumes-de-Venise (2005), Vinsobres (2005), Rasteau (2010) and Cairanne (2016). The appellation has 5,822 hectares. The allowed yield is 41 hl/ha, while the average is 32 hl/ha. Côtes-du-Rhône-Villages-wine must contain at least 50% Grenache and 20% Syrah and/or Mourvèdre and must have an alcoholic strength of at least 12.5%. It is allowed to use up to 15% of wine from previous years at the blending. (2021-01)

Côtes-du-Rhône-Villages grapes, Grenache up to 65%, Carignan up to 10%, Syrah with Cinsault and Mourvèdre up to (at least) 25%.

 

Côtes-du-Rhône-Villages the best vintages, 1978, 1990, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2016; not 2017. (2019-05)

 

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