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CHÂT(OLIV)-CHÂT(PÉTR)

 

CABE-CARM   CARM-CENT   CENT-CHAM   CHAM-CHAM   CHAM-CHÂT   CHÂT(BALE)-CHÂT(BRAN)   CHÂT(BRAN)-CHÂT(CHEV)   CHÂT(CHEV)-CHÂT(DAUG)   CHÂT(DAUZ)-CHÂT(DEST)   CHÂT (DOIS)-CHÂT(GAZI)   CHÂT(GISC)-CHÂT(HAUT)   CHÂT(HAUT)-CHÂT(LACL)   CHÂT(LACL)-CHÂT(LAFO)   CHÂT(LAGA)-CHÂT(LATO)   CHÂT(LATO)-CHÂT(LÉOV)   CHÂT(LEPR)-CHÂT(MARQ)   CHÂT(MARQ)-CHÂT(OLIV)   CHÂT(OLIV)-CHÂT(PÉTR)   CHÂT(PÉTR)-CHÂT(ROCH)   CHÂT(ROLL)-CHÂT(VILL)   CHÂT(D'YQU)-CHIL   CHIL-CLOS   CLOS-COLD   COLD-CÔTE   CÔTE-CÔTE   CÔTE-CÔTE   CÔTE-CUVÉ

 

 

Only 4,5 and 5,0 NJP-wines (Nenad Jelisic Points) are presented as the best vintages.

 

If for some wine stands behind the best vintages none, it means that the wine's price is too high for its quality or the wine's quality is too low.

 

 

Château Olivier, Blanc (white dry blend wine), Classified according to the 1959 Classification for both red and white wines, Pessac-Léognan, Graves, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Palmer, a French wine castle (château in French) that is located in the appellation Margaux and, which according to the 1855 Classification was classified as Troisièmes Crus. The Château Palmer is considered to be the second best wine chateaux after Château Margaux in the Margaux appellation. The vineyards of Château Palmer cover 55 hectares. (2011-03)

 

Château Palmer, a French wine of Château Palmer. The wine consists of 40 to 52% Merlot (considerably more than many wine chateaux in the Médoc wine district), 6% Petit Verdot and the remaining part of Cabernet Sauvignon. The high quality of the wine is achieved by: a high density of plantation (10,000 vines per hectare), a rigorous selection of hand-picked grapes in the field and at three sorting table in the cellar, the use of 50 stainless steel tanks, which enables each specific part of the vineyard is fermented separately, carefully controlled fermentation and maceration temperature, which is tailored to each specific part of the vineyard, and repeated tastings, which facilitates the selection of wines that will be used in the final blending. Average age of the vines is 38 years (year 2011) and the yield is 30-35 hl/ha. After the grapes have been carefully selected in the field and in the cellar, they are destemmed and crushed very gently. The crushed mass (must) consisting of grape juice, pulp, skins and seeds is pumped into vats of stainless steel where fermentation begins. The fermentation takes place over an 8 to 10 days long period. In order to intensify leaching, the fermenting wine is pumped, several times per day, from the bottom of the fermenter over the skin mass. After the fermentation the fermented wine is macerated for 10 days and then moved to French oak barrels (barriques) where the wine undergoes malolactic fermentation. Once the malolactic fermentation, which usually take a month, is completed, the wine is moved in 50% new French oak barrels (barriques) and aged for a period of 18 to 21 months. During the aging the wine is moved (racked) from one barrel to another about 5 times and clarified by the use of 5 to 6 egg whites one time. The wine does not undergo filtration. After the aging, the wine is bottled and aged for a few months before it is released on the market. Château Palmer has a great aging potential from 10 to 40 years. (2011-03)

 

Château Palmer (red dry blend wine), Troisièmes Crus according to the 1855 Classification, Margaux, Haut Médoc, Médoc, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, 1900, 1928, 1945, 1961, 1966, 1983, 1989, 1999, 2000, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018. (2019-08)

 

Château Palmer grapes, 47% Cabernet Sauvignon, 47% Merlot and 6% Petit Verdot. (2011-03)

 

Château Palmer soils, dominated by gravel with some clay. (2011-03)

 

Château Pape Clément (red dry blend wine), Classified according to the 1959 Classification for both red and white wines, Pessac-Léognan, Graves, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 1999 none; 2000, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2016 and 2018. (2020-03)

 

Château Pape Clément, Blanc (white dry blend wine), Classified according to the 1959 Classification for both red and white wines, Pessac-Léognan, Graves, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2005 none; 2006, 2007, 2009 och 2012; from vintage 2013 until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Pavie (red dry blend wine), Premier Grand Cru Classé B, Saint Émilion, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 1997 none; 1998, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018. (2020-03)

 

Château Pavie-Decesse (red dry blend wine), Grand Cru Classé, Saint Émilion, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 1997 none; 1998, 2000, 2003, 2009, 2010, 2016, 2017 and 2018. (2020-03)

 

Château Pavie-Macquin (red dry blend wine), Grand Cru Classé, Saint Émilion, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 1997 none; 1998, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2016, 2017 and 2018. (2019-08)

 

Château Peby Faugeres (red dry blend wine), Grand Cru Classé, Saint Émilion, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, 2000, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2015, 2016 and 2018. (2020-03)

 

Château Pédesclaux (red dry blend wine), Cinquièmes Crus according to the 1855 Classification, Pauillac, Haut Médoc, Médoc, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Petit-Faurie-De-Soutard (red dry blend wine), Grand Cru Classé, Saint Émilion, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Petit Village (red dry blend wine), Pomerol, Libournais, Bordeaux, France, the best vintages, until vintage 2018 none. (2020-03)

 

Château Pétrus, a French wine castle (château in French) that is located in the Pomerol appellation. Although the wines of Pomerol have never been classified, Château Pétrus and Le Pin are considered as the appellation’s best. The Château Pétrus has 11,5 hectares. The vineyards are situated at an altitude of 40 m, which is one of the highest in Pomerol. The vines are on average 40 years old and every six to nine years one hectare of vines, which are considered be too old, is replanted. (2012-01)

 

Château Pétrus, a French wine of Château Pétrus. The wine consists of 85 to 100% Merlot and 0 to 15% Cabernet Franc. Château Pétrus is considered as one of the world's most expensive. According Liveex.com 12 bottles of vintage 2005 cost 33,866 GBP (year 2012). The reasons for Pétrus very high quality is several: the natural drainage, thanks to that the vineyards are one of the highest located in the appellation Pomerol, the unique soils, the high age of the vines, the rigorous selection of the hand-picked grapes in the field and in the wine cellar; a laser optical sorting machine have been used since 2009. The average yield is incredible low 23 hl/ha. After the grapes have been carefully selected in the field and in the cellar, they are destemmed (some years the grapes are not destemmed) and crushed very gently. The crushed mass (must) consisting of grape juice, pulp, skins and seeds is pumped into vats of concrete where fermentation is carried out. After the fermentation, the wine is moved in 50% new French oak barrels (barriques) and aged for a period of 22 to 28 months. During the aging the wine is moved (racked) from one barrel to another a few times and clarified by the use of egg whites one time. The wine does not undergo filtration. After the aging, the wine is bottled and aged for a few months before it is released on the market. Château Pétrus has a great aging potential from 15 to 70 years. (2016-01)

 

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